Contribute
CONNECT:

research

A Tale Of Two Countries: Canada’s Immigration System Versus The U.S.

- January 29, 2018

 

Some Liberals Across The U.S. Vowed To Move To Canada If Hillary Clinton Lost The Election…But Would They Even Be Admitted?


TOP TAKEAWAYS

  • During the 2016 presidential election, celebrities like Barbra Streisand and Lena Dunham threatened to move to Canada if Donald Trump became president, but have yet to leave the U.S.
  • Unfortunately for liberals, moving to Canada is a lot more difficult than most Americans think, requiring sponsorship by an immediate family member or specialization in a skill that is in short supply.
  • Unlike the U.S., Canada’s immigration system is merit-based, with applicants being ranked based on their chance of economic success and integration, with points awarded to the “best candidates.”
  • A comparison of the immigrant admissions numbers of Canada and the U.S. reveals the selective nature of Canada’s immigration system, which emphasizes the admission of immigrants whose skills and assets match need rather than existing family ties.
  • In 2015, 24.09 percent of Canada’s new permanent residents were family-sponsored immigrants, while 64.6 percent of the United States’ new permanent residents were family-sponsored immigrants.
  • In Canada, immigrant admissions based on employment skills accounted for 58 percent of new immigrants in 2017, while U.S. admissions for employment skills accounted for less than 14 percent of lawful permanent resident admissions.
  • In contrast to the U.S., Canada does not have a diversity visa lottery program.

DURING THE 2016 PRESIDENTIAL RACE, LIBERALS ACROSS AMERICA THREATENED TO LEAVE THE COUNTRY IF DONALD TRUMP BECAME PRESIDENT

Several Celebrities, Such As Barbra Streisand And Lena Dunham, Vowed To Move To Canada After Trump Won The Election, But Have Yet To Follow Through

Singer-Songwriter Barbra Streisand: (Christine Rousselle, “Where Are They Now? These 23 Celebrities Said They'd Move If Trump Won,” Townhall, 1/16/17)

Actress Lena Dunham: (Christine Rousselle, “Where Are They Now? These 23 Celebrities Said They'd Move If Trump Won,” Townhall, 1/16/17)

Actor And Comedian Keegan-Michael Key: (Christine Rousselle, “Where Are They Now? These 23 Celebrities Said They'd Move If Trump Won,” Townhall, 1/16/17)

Actress And Singer Raven-Symoné: (Christine Rousselle, “Where Are They Now? These 23 Celebrities Said They'd Move If Trump Won,” Townhall, 1/16/17)

Actress And Former Model Chloë Sevigny: (Christine Rousselle, “Where Are They Now? These 23 Celebrities Said They'd Move If Trump Won,” Townhall, 1/16/17)

BUT A LOOK AT CANADA’S IMMIGRATION POLICY SHOWS WHY THEY MAY NOT HAVE MOVED… IN CONTRAST TO THE U.S., CANADA’S IMMIGRATION SYSTEM, IS DRIVEN BY MERIT, NOT EXISTING FAMILY TIES OR DIVERSITY

Canada And The U.S.  Have “Reversed” Immigration Systems, With Canada Favoring Immigrants With Economic Skills And The U.S. Favoring Those With Family Ties

About 63 Percent Of Those Granted Legal Permanent Residence In Canada Are Admitted For Their Economic Skills, While 63 Percent Of U.S. Green Cards Are Given To Immigrants With Family Connections. “About 63% of those granted legal permanent residence in Canada — the final step before becoming citizens — are admitted for their economic skills, with only 24% admitted based on having family members living in the country. The U.S. system is reversed: 63% of green cards are given to immigrants with family connections, and only 13% given based on economic reasons.” (Alan Gomez, “Canada's 'Merit-Based' Immigration System Wins Trump's Praise,” USA Today, 3/1/17)

Canada Admits Immigrants Based On Their “Chance Of Economic Success And Integration”

Canada’s Immigration Application System For Skilled Immigrants Has Been Compared To “Online Dating.” “The best way to describe Canada’s new application system for skilled immigrants is to compare it to online dating.” (Alexia Fernández Campbell, “The Philosophical Differences On Immigration Between Canada And The U.S.,” The Atlantic, 6/24/16)

  • Applicant Must “Fill Out Online Profiles With Their Age, Resume, Language Skills, Education, And Much More.” Foreigners around the world who want to emigrate to Canada fill out online profiles with their age, resume, language skills, education, and much more.” (Alexia Fernández Campbell, “The Philosophical Differences On Immigration Between Canada And The U.S.,” The Atlantic, 6/24/16)

“Federal Workers Then Peruse Their Profiles, Which Are Ranked Based On The Applicant’s Chance Of Economic Success And Integration,” Awarding Points To The “Best Candidates.” “Federal workers then peruse their profiles, which are ranked based on the applicant’s chance of economic success and integration. Though it doesn’t use a matchmaking algorithm, the system does award the most points to those it considers the best candidates. (Alexia Fernández Campbell, “The Philosophical Differences On Immigration Between Canada And The U.S.,” The Atlantic, 6/24/16)

  • People Get Points Based On Job Offers, Fluency In Speak English And French, And Their Age, And “Whether Or Not They Have Work Experience In A High-Demand Field.” People get points if they already have a job offer. They can also rack up points depending on how well they speak English and French, whether or not they are young, and whether or not they have work experience in a high-demand field.” (Alexia Fernández Campbell, “The Philosophical Differences On Immigration Between Canada And The U.S.,” The Atlantic, 6/24/16)

“Potential Immigrants With High Rankings Are Invited To Apply For Permanent Residency.” “Potential immigrants with high rankings are invited to apply for permanent residency.” (Alexia Fernández Campbell, “The Philosophical Differences On Immigration Between Canada And The U.S.,” The Atlantic, 6/24/16)

The Merit-Based System Allows Canada To “Be Pickier,” Admitting Immigrants That Are “Well-Educated, Literate In The Local Language, And Have Great Credentials”

Canada’s Merit-Based System “Throws Away The Traditional, First-Come-First-Serve Model,” Which Means In Practice That “Canada Can Be Pickier.”  “It’s a tool that basically throws away the traditional, first-come-first-serve model that Canada—and the United States—has long followed. What it means in practice is that Canada can be pickier.” (Alexia Fernández Campbell, “The Philosophical Differences On Immigration Between Canada And The U.S.,” The Atlantic, 6/24/16)

  • For Example, In 2015, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Added “30 Points For Candidates Who Had Graduated, As Foreign Students, From A Canadian University.” “After Prime Minister Justin Trudeau entered office later in 2015, his Liberal government rejiggered the formula again, greatly reducing the number of points awarded for a job offer and adding 30 points for candidates who had graduated, as foreign students, from a Canadian university.” (Catherine Porter, “Canada’s Immigration System, Lauded By Trump. Is More Complex Than Advertised,” The New York Times, 3/2/17)
  • The Country’s Provinces And Territories Have Created Their Own Point Systems Base On Their Job Markets. “Add separate point systems drafted by the country’s provinces and territories based on their job markets, and the system grows even more head-scratching. Saskatchewan, for instance, is recruiting long-haul truck drivers and hospitality workers, while Alberta wants food and beverage processors.” (Catherine Porter, “Canada’s Immigration System, Lauded By Trump. Is More Complex Than Advertised,” The New York Times, 3/2/17)

The New York Times: “The Immigrants Coming In Under This System Are Well Educated, Literate In The Local Language And Have Great Credentials.”  “Still, the principle remains: The immigrants coming in under this system are well educated, literate in the local language and have great credentials.” (Catherine Porter, “Canada’s Immigration System, Lauded By Trump. Is More Complex Than Advertised,” The New York Times, 3/2/17)

In 2015, Canada “Identified 66,360 Newcomers As Economic Immigrations For Their Occupational Skills.” “Mr. Vineberg offered government immigration statistics from 2015 as an example. That year, Canada identified 66,360 newcomers as economic immigrants for their occupational skills.” (Catherine Porter, “Canada’s Immigration System, Lauded By Trump. Is More Complex Than Advertised,” The New York Times, 3/2/17)

  • Around 36,300 Were Fluent In One National Language, Had A College Degree, And Likely Would Have Been Recruited For A Specific Job. “Around 36,300 were categorized in the top two classes, meaning they were fluent in one national language and had a college degree. Most would have been recruited for a specific job, Mr. Vineberg said: for instance, vice president of a company or administrator of a hospital.” (Catherine Porter, “Canada’s Immigration System, Lauded By Trump. Is More Complex Than Advertised,” The New York Times, 3/2/17)
  • “Another 22,700 Were Picked For A Job In Skilled Trades, Like An Industrial Electrician,” And Had “At Least Some Postsecondary Training And Certification In Their Trade.” “Another 22,700 were picked for a job in skilled trades, like an industrial electrician. They needed the language skills to read a blueprint and follow complicated directions, and at least some postsecondary training and certification in their trade.” (Catherine Porter, “Canada’s Immigration System, Lauded By Trump. Is More Complex Than Advertised,” The New York Times, 3/2/17)
  • “Only 2,177 Were Brought In As Laborers, And Even They Would Have Been Chosen For Specific Positions.” “Only 2,177 were brought in as laborers, and even they would have been chosen for specific positions, most likely in a hard-to-fill job or a remote location — for instance, a Japanese-speaking hotel receptionist in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Mr. Vineberg said.” (Catherine Porter, “Canada’s Immigration System, Lauded By Trump. Is More Complex Than Advertised,” The New York Times, 3/2/17)

Canada’s Merit-Based System Selects Immigrants Who Are In A Position To Contribute To The Country’s Economy

The Merit-Based System Selects Immigrants Who Are In A Position To Contribute To The American Economy. “The merit-based system will select immigrants based on education, skills, work experience, language proficiency and age. The main argument for a merit-based system is that it favours immigrants who being skilled are in a position to contribute to the American economy.” (“If Donald Trump Goes For Merit-Based Immigration In US, Here’s What Happens,” The Economic Times, 11/2/17)

  • “Low-Skilled Immigrants Under The Current Family-Based System Bring Wages Down And Get More Out Of The Economy Than Contributing To It.” “Low-skilled immigrants under the current family-based system bring wages down and get more out of the economy than contributing to it.” (“If Donald Trump Goes For Merit-Based Immigration In US, Here’s What Happens,” The Economic Times, 11/2/17)

“Immigrants To Canada Work Harder, Create More Businesses And Typically Use Fewer Welfare Dollars Than Do Their Native-Born Compatriots.” “‘Immigrants to Canada work harder, create more businesses and typically use fewer welfare dollars than do their native-born compatriots,’ writes [New York Time’s Jonathan] Tepperman.” (Alayna Treene, “The Canadian Case For Merit-Based Immigration,” Axios, 6/28/16)

“About Half Of All Canadian Immigrants Arrive With A College Degree, While The Figure In The United States Is Just 27 Percent.” “‘About half of all Canadian immigrants arrive with a college degree, while the figure in the United States is just 27 percent,’ explains [New York Time’s Jonathan] Tepperman.” (Alayna Treene, “The Canadian Case For Merit-Based Immigration,” Axios, 6/28/16)

“Immigrant Children In Canadian Schools Read At The Same Level As The Native Born, While The Gap Is Huge In The United States.” “Immigrant children in Canadian schools read at the same level as the native born, while the gap is huge in the United States.” (Alayna Treene, “The Canadian Case For Merit-Based Immigration,” Axios, 6/28/16)

“Canadian Immigrants Are Almost 20 Percent More Likely To Own Their Own Homes And 7 Percent Less Likely To Live In Poverty Than Their American Equivalents.” “Canadian immigrants are almost 20 percent more likely to own their own homes and 7 percent less likely to live in poverty than their American equivalents.” (Alayna Treene, “The Canadian Case For Merit-Based Immigration,” Axios, 6/28/16)

With A Sponsorship By An Immediate Family Member Or A Special Skill In High-Demand Required For Lawful Permanent Status, It Is More Difficult Than Expected To Move North

Americans Looking To Move To Canada Would “Need Sponsorship By An Immediate Family Member” Or To “Be A Skilled Worker In A Category That Is In Short Supply.” “However, for other Americans, permanently settling in Canada is a little more difficult: Most would need sponsorship by an immediate family member — like a spouse, parent or dependent child — or to be a skilled worker in a category that's in short supply in Canada.” (Audrea Lim, “Want To Move To Canada If Trump Wins? Not So Fast,” Rolling Stone, 5/5/16)

“But Even Then, Waiting Times For Permanent Residency Average About Two Years Through Family Sponsorship” And “Competition Among Applicants Remains Steep.” “But even then, waiting times for permanent residency average about two years through family sponsorship, and many years longer for live-in caregivers applying as workers, while competition among applicants remains steep — the backlog for live-in caregivers alone is currently 38,000-people deep.” (Audrea Lim, “Want To Move To Canada If Trump Wins? Not So Fast,” Rolling Stone, 5/5/16)

Unlike The U.S., Canada Does Not Have A Diversity Lottery

In 2015, The U.S. Admitted 47,934 Immigrants Through The Diversity Lottery. (Ryan Baugh and Katherine Witsman, “U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents: 2015,” Department Of Homeland Security, 03/2017)

Canada Does Not Have A Diversity Lottery Like The U.S. “A widespread rumour that Canada is due to begin a new immigration lottery, similar to the DV visa lottery in the United States, is untrue.” (“There Is No New Canadian Visa Lottery Program, Despite Widespread Rumours,” Canada Visa, 1/31/17)

THE SELECTIVITY OF CANADA’S IMMIGRATION SYSTEM IS BORNE OUT BY A DRAMATIC DIFFERENCE IN IMMIGRATION NUMBERS

Canada Is Far More Restrictive In Allowing Chain Migration 

In 2015, 271,845 New Permanent Residents Were Admitted To Canada. (“Annual Report To Parliament On Immigration 2016,” Government Of Canada, 2016)

  • In 2015, Canada Allowed The Admission Of 65,490 Family-Sponsored Immigrants. (“Annual Report To Parliament On Immigration 2016,” Government Of Canada, 2016)

In 2015, 1.05 Million New Lawful Permanent Residents Were Admitted To The U.S. (Ryan Baugh and Katherine Witsman, “U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents: 2015,” Department Of Homeland Security, 03/2017)

  • In The U.S., 678,978 Out Of The 1.05 Million Immigrants Accepted Were Admitted Through Family-Sponsored Immigration In 2015. (Ryan Baugh and Katherine Witsman, “U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents: 2015,” Department Of Homeland Security, 03/2015)

  • Nearly 65 Percent Of 2015 U.S. Immigrants Were Family-Sponsored Immigrants. (Ryan Baugh and Katherine Witsman, “U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents: 2015,” Department Of Homeland Security, 03/2015)

In 2015, Canada Had 26,337 More Immigrants Admitted Based On Employment-Based Preferences Than The U.S.

In Canada, There Were 170,384 Admissions Based On Economic Preferences In 2015. (“Annual Report To Parliament On Immigration 2016,” Government Of Canada, 2016)

In The U.S., 144,047 Out Of 1.05 Million Immigrants Were Admitted Based On Employment-Based Preferences In 2015. (Ryan Baugh and Katherine Witsman, “U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents: 2015,” Department Of Homeland Security, 03/15)

  • Less Than 14 Percent Of New Immigrant Admissions Were Employment-Based In 2015. (Ryan Baugh and Katherine Witsman, “U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents: 2015,” Department Of Homeland Security, 03/2015)

 


Previous post

SOTU: One Year Of Trump Building A Safe, Strong, And Proud America

Next post

Trump’s Economy Soars Above Obama’s
Republican National Committee

Connect With Us

Republican National Committee
Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel
News & Videos
  • 310 First Street SE, Washington, DC 20003
  • 202-863-8500

By providing your phone number, you are consenting to receive calls and SMS/MMS msgs, including autodialed and automated calls and texts, to that number from the Republican National Committee. Msg&data rates may apply. Terms & conditions/privacy policy apply 80810-info.com.

Paid for by the Republican National Committee. Not Authorized By Any Candidate Or Candidate's Committee. www.gop.com

By providing your phone number, you are consenting to receive calls and SMS/MMS msgs, including autodialed and automated calls and texts, to that number from the Republican National Committee. Msg&data rates may apply. Terms & conditions/privacy policy apply 80810-info.com.

Paid for by the Republican National Committee.
Not Authorized By Any Candidate Or Candidate's Committee. www.gop.com