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Swiss Diss: Annoying Immigrants Need Not Apply

- June 21, 2018

Looking At The Immigration Policies Of Foreign Countries Shows How Lax America's Immigration System Really Is


TOP TAKEAWAYS

  • In Switzerland, foreigners who wish to become naturalized must go through a vetting process, which can include "requests to name local cheeses," and an applicants' local peers get to have a say in whether someone is approved or not.
    • An applicant that lived in Switzerland for 34 years and spoke fluent Swiss-German was rejected for being too annoying.
      • Members of the village said they rejected the applicant because of her lack of respect for the village, saying she opposed the Swiss cultural practice of putting large bells around the necks of cows.
    • An American who taught as a professor at Switzerland's top university and had lived in the country for 39 years was denied citizenship after local officials ruled he was not "sufficiently integrated to merit citizenship."
  • Switzerland will not allow foreigners to become naturalized if they have "benefited from social welfare three years before applying or during the naturalization process."
  • Denmark passed a law allowing officials to seize cash and valuables from asylum seekers amid concerns that the newcomers could strain welfare systems and undermine the nation's quality of life.
    • Similar laws exist in Switzerland and Germany, with dozens of cases reported in Switzerland where migrants' assets were confiscated to fund their living expenses.
  • While immigrants account for 13.5 percent of the total U.S. population, foreign residents make up only 2 percent of the total population in Japan, which has a "strict" and "arbitrary" naturalization process that only accepts about 1,000 new naturalizations each year.
  • Japan has been "passive" in recognizing refugees, accepting 301 refugees from 1981 to 2002 and accepting only 20 of the 19,628 asylum seekers in 2017.
  • Austria requires ten years of continues residence before granting naturalization and top government officials have proposed subjecting asylum-seekers to a curfew, and mandatory x-rays to determine an asylum-seekers' age.
  • Canada and the U.S. have reversed immigration systems, with Canada favoring immigrants with economic skills and the U.S. favoring those with family ties.
    • Canada's application system for skilled immigrants has been compared to "online dating," where applicants "fill out online profiles with their age, resume, language skills, education, and much more" so that federal workers can "peruse their profiles, which are ranked based on the applicant's chance of economic success and integration."
  • The United Kingdom uses a "points-based" immigration system, awarding more points to applicants with higher salaries.

SWITZERLAND'S IMMIGRATION POLICIES

In Switzerland, Foreigners Who Wish To Become Naturalized Must Go Through A Vetting Process, Which Can Include "Requests To Name Local Cheeses Or Mountains"

The Atlantic Headline: "In Switzerland, You Can Be Denied Citizenship for Being Too Annoying" (Megan Garber, "In Switzerland, You Can Be Denied Citizenship for Being Too Annoying," The Atlantic , 1/14/17)

Swiss Law "Requires Foreigners To Be Residents Of The Country For 12 Years Before Applying For Citizenship," And After That, They Must "Undergo A Series Of Tests And Interviews To Assess Their Suitability." "Swiss law typically requires foreigners to be residents of the country for 12 years before applying for citizenship; after that they must undergo a series of tests and interviews to assess their suitability, and are judged by criteria that differ from one canton to another." (Nick Cumming-Bruce, "Switzerland Votes To Ease Citizenship For Third-Generation Immigrants," The New York Times , 2/12/17)

Unlike The United States, "Switzerland Does Not Grant Automatic Citizenship To Children Born On Its Soil." "Unlike the United States and some European countries, Switzerland does not grant automatic citizenship to children born on its soil." (Nick Cumming-Bruce, "Switzerland Votes To Ease Citizenship For Third-Generation Immigrants," The New York Times , 2/12/17)

The Current Vetting Procedure "Can Include Requests To Name Local Cheeses Or Mountains." "The current vetting procedure, aimed at ensuring that new citizens are well integrated, includes interviews carried out by town councils. Questions put to interviewees can include requests to name local cheeses or mountains." (Switzerland Votes To Relax Its Citizenship Rules," BBC News, 2/12/17)

"In Switzerland, Applications For Naturalization Are Decided Not At The Federal Level, But Rather By The Country's Cantons And Municipalities-And The Applicants' Peers Have A Say In Whether Naturalization Gets Granted." "The reason? In Switzerland, applications for naturalization are decided not at the federal level, but rather by the country's cantons and municipalities-and the applicants' peers have a say in whether naturalization gets granted. And, unfortunately for Nancy Holten, her peers are not inclined to give her the 'gift' of a passport." (Megan Garber, "In Switzerland, You Can Be Denied Citizenship for Being Too Annoying," The Atlantic , 1/14/17)

Despite Nancy Holten Living In Switzerland For 34 Years, Speaking Fluent Swiss-German, And Raising Two Daughter Who Are Swiss Citizens, Holten Was Rejected For Naturalized Swiss Citizenship For Being Too Annoying. "Nancy Holten, 42, was born in the Netherlands. At the age of 8, however, she moved with her family to Switzerland, which Holten has called home for the past 34 years. Holten currently resides, with her three daughters, in the small village of Gipf-Oberfrick, in the far north of the country, within the canton of Aargau. She speaks fluent Swiss-German. Her daughters are Swiss citizens. She has been a member of the parents' committee of their school. And yet Holten was recently rejected for a Swiss passport-which is also to say, effectively, for naturalized Swiss citizenship. For the second time." (Megan Garber, "In Switzerland, You Can Be Denied Citizenship for Being Too Annoying," The Atlantic , 1/14/17)

  • "In 2015, Holten's Application For Naturalization Was Approved By Local Authorities But Then Rejected, In A Vote, By 144 Of 206 Residents Of Gipf-Oberfrick." "In 2015, Holten's application for naturalization was approved by local authorities but then rejected, in a vote, by 144 of 206 residents of Gipf-Oberfrick. In November of 2016, a similarly sized group gathered at a communal assembly to hear Holten's case." (Megan Garber, "In Switzerland, You Can Be Denied Citizenship for Being Too Annoying," The Atlantic , 1/14/17)
  • Members Of The Village Said They Rejected Holten Receiving Citizenship Because Of Her Lack Of Respect For The Village. "Some of the attendees booed her as the debates took place. For them, it seems, the matter wasn't so much that Holten was outspoken in her criticism of the bells (though Tanja Suter, the president of the local branch of the Swiss People's Party, did complain to reporters that Holten has a 'big mouth'). The problem was rather that Holten's activism, they have said, displays a lack of respect for the village's-and the country's-cultural traditions. The problem was also, more to the point, that Holten had demonstrated that disrespect so publicly." (Megan Garber, "In Switzerland, You Can Be Denied Citizenship for Being Too Annoying," The Atlantic , 1/14/17)
  • Holten Was Rejected Because She "Stridently Opposed One Of The Most Beloved Cultural Traditions Of Gipf-Oberfrick, And Of Aargau, And Of Switzerland Itself: The Practice Of Putting Large Bells Around The Necks Of Cows." "Because, despite all the ways she is Swiss, Holten-a vegan who is extremely vocal about that life choice-has also stridently opposed one of the most beloved cultural traditions of Gipf-Oberfrick, and of Aargau, and of Switzerland itself: the practice of putting large bells around the necks of cows, for reasons both practical and ceremonial." (Megan Garber, "In Switzerland, You Can Be Denied Citizenship for Being Too Annoying," The Atlantic , 1/14/17)

In 2014, An American Who Taught As A Professor At Switzerland's Top University Was Denied Swiss Citizenship After Local Officials Ruled He Did Not Know Enough About The Region Where He Has Lived For 39 Years." "A 75-year-old expat American who taught as a professor at Switzerland's top university was denied Swiss citizenship after local officials ruled he did not know enough about the region where he has lived for 39 years." (Malcolm Curtis, "Expat Denied Swiss Citizenship After 39 Years," The Local , 10/14/14)

  • The Municipal District Assembly Where The American Lives Upheld A Decision Of The District Council Following A Half-Hour Decision, Concluding That He Was Not "Sufficiently Integrated To Merit Citizenship." "The municipal district assembly of Einsiedeln, a monastery town in the canton of Schwyz where the American lives, upheld a decision of the district council following a half-hour decision. The assembly concluded that the academic was not sufficiently integrated to merit citizenship." (Malcolm Curtis, "Expat Denied Swiss Citizenship After 39 Years," The Local , 10/14/14)

Switzerland Will Not Allow Foreigners To Become Naturalized If They Have "Benefited From Social Welfare Three Years Before Applying Or During The Naturalization Process"

In 2017, "The Swiss Supreme Court Rejected An Appeal By A Family Of Iraqi And Pakistan Origin Whose Swiss Nationality Application Was Rejected Due To Non-Repayment Of Social Welfare Benefits." "The Swiss Supreme Court has rejected an appeal by a family of Iraqi and Pakistani origin whose Swiss nationality application was rejected due to non-repayment of social welfare benefits." (Swiss Nationality Request Rejected For Not Repaying Welfare," Swissinfo.ch , 5/19/17)

The Family Submitted Their Application For Naturalization In February 2013; "However, Nine Months Later, The Canton Amended Its Laws On Naturalisation That Required Applicants To Have Reimbursed Any Social Welfare Payments Made In The Last Ten Years." "The family - a 50-year old Pakistani man, his 38-year-old Iraqi wife and their eight-year-old daughter - had submitted their application for naturalisation in February 2013 to the canton Bern authorities. However, nine months later, the canton had amended it laws on naturalisation that required applicants to have reimbursed any social welfare payments made in the last ten years." (Swiss Nationality Request Rejected For Not Repaying Welfare," Swissinfo.ch , 5/19/17)

After The Amendment To The Law, Officials Requested The Family To Provide Proof That They Had Repaid Welfare Payments But The Applicants Decided To Press On With Their Original Application. "After the amendment to the law, the Bern cantonal officials had requested the family to provide proof that they had repaid welfare payments but the applicants decided to press on with their original application." (Swiss Nationality Request Rejected For Not Repaying Welfare," Swissinfo.ch , 5/19/17)

Federal Requirements Will Now Include That Applicants "Cannot Have Benefited From Social Welfare Three Years Before Applying Or During The Naturalisation Procedure." "However, federal requirements will be made more uniform under a revised law that comes into effect in 2018. For example, knowledge of a national language to a minimum spoken level of B1 and written level of A2 will be required. Applicants cannot have benefited from social welfare three years before applying or during the naturalisation procedure either." (Swiss Nationality Request Rejected For Not Repaying Welfare," Swissinfo.ch , 5/19/17)

DENMARK'S IMMIGRATION POLICIES

In Denmark, Officials Can Seize Cash And Valuables From Asylum Seekers To Ensure They Do Not Drain The Welfare System

In 2016, Danish Lawmakers Voted In Favor Of "Controversial Legislation Empowering Authorities To Seize Cash And Valuables From Asylum Seekers To Help Cover Their Expenses." "Danish lawmakers voted Tuesday in favor of controversial legislation empowering authorities to seize cash and valuables from asylum seekers to help cover their expenses." (Arwa Damon and Tim Hume, "Denmark Adopts Controversial Law To Seize Asylum Seekers' Valuables," CNN , 1/26/16)

  • The So-Called Jewelry Bills Allows the Seizure Of Valuables Worth More Than $1,453. "The passing of the so-called jewelry bill allows the seizure of valuables worth more than 10,000 Danish kroner (about $1,453). Items of 'special sentimental value' such as 'wedding rings, engagement rings, family portraits, decorations and medals' are exempted, according to the Danish Ministry of Immigration, Integration and Housing. But 'watches, mobile phones and computers' can be confiscated, it says." (Arwa Damon and Tim Hume, "Denmark Adopts Controversial Law To Seize Asylum Seekers' Valuables," CNN , 1/26/16)

Lawmakers Said The Legislation Was About "Ensuring That Asylum Seekers Contribute To The Country's Generous Welfare State." "Denmark's ruling Liberal Party says the legislation is about ensuring that asylum seekers contribute to the country's generous welfare state." (Arwa Damon and Tim Hume, "Denmark Adopts Controversial Law To Seize Asylum Seekers' Valuables," CNN , 1/26/16)

  • Denmark Erected Barriers Amid Concerns That The Newcomers Could Strain Welfare Systems, Threaten Security And Undermine The Nation's Quality Of Life. "As Europe confronts its greatest movement of refugees since World War II, even formerly open countries like Denmark are erecting barriers amid concerns that the newcomers could strain welfare systems, threaten security and undermine the nations' quality of life." (Dan Bilefsky, "Danish Law Requires Asylum Seekers to Hand Over Valuables" The New York Times , 1/26/16)

Similar Laws Exist In Switzerland And Germany, With Dozens Of Cases Were Reported In Switzerland Of Migrants' Assets Being Confiscated To Fund Their Living Expenses. "Similar laws exist in Switzerland and Germany, according to officials there. Dozens of cases were reported in Switzerland of migrants' assets being confiscated to fund their living expenses, although in Germany it was unclear if, or how widely, the policy was enforced." (Arwa Damon and Tim Hume, "Denmark Adopts Controversial Law To Seize Asylum Seekers' Valuables," CNN , 1/26/16)

Others Say "It Has More To Do With Deterring Further Arrivals Of Migrants And Asylum Seekers Who Have Entered Europe In Numbers Not Seen Since World War II." "But others -- both backers and critics of the law -- say it has more to do with deterring further arrivals of migrants and asylum seekers who have entered Europe in numbers not seen since World War II." (Arwa Damon and Tim Hume, "Denmark Adopts Controversial Law To Seize Asylum Seekers' Valuables," CNN , 1/26/16)

"Lawmakers Also Voted To Triple the Period Of Time Before Asylum Seekers Can Apply For Separated Family Members To Be Reunited With Them," Which Is Expected To Have An Even Greater Deterrent Effect On Potential Migrants. "Lawmakers also voted to triple the period of time before asylum seekers can apply for separated family members to be reunited with them in Denmark. That measure, which extends the period from one year to three, is expected to have an even greater deterrent effect on potential migrants." (Arwa Damon and Tim Hume, "Denmark Adopts Controversial Law To Seize Asylum Seekers' Valuables," CNN , 1/26/16)

JAPAN'S IMMIGRATION POLICIES

In Japan, Children Gain Citizenship Based On Their Parents' Japanese Nationality, Rather Than By Virtue Of Their Birth On Japanese Soil, Making Immigration In Japan "Exclusionary"

In Japan, Children Gain Citizenship Based On Their Parents' Japanese Nationality, Rather Than By Virtue Of Their Birth On Japanese Soil. "Immigration to Japan was and remains relatively exclusionary. Children gain citizenship based on their parents' Japanese nationality rather than by virtue of their birth on Japanese soil (jus sanguinis rather than jus soli). Consequently, zainichi and their descendants can retain foreign nationality even though they may be third- or fourth-generation descendants born and raised entirely in Japan." (David Green, "As Its Population Ages, Japan Quietly Turns To Immigration," Migration Policy Institute , 3/28/17)

While Naturalization Is Available In Japan, The Path Is Regarded As "Arbitrary And Quite Strict In Nature." "Naturalization is available, though the path is often regarded as arbitrary and quite strict in nature." (David Green, "As Its Population Ages, Japan Quietly Turns To Immigration," Migration Policy Institute , 3/28/17)

Japan Does Offer A Path Toward Permanent Residence, But A Person Must Maintain A Minimum Of 10 Years Continuous Presence To Qualify For Permanent Residency. "Finally, as all recruitment categories have expanded, the path toward permanent residence has been clarified and eased somewhat. In general, immigrants must maintain a minimum of ten years continuous presence to qualify for permanent residency, and are able to change their visa status within that period." (David Green, "As Its Population Ages, Japan Quietly Turns To Immigration," Migration Policy Institute , 3/28/17)

Foreign Residents Make Up Only 2 Percent Of The Total Population In Japan, While Immigrants Account For 13.5 Percent Of The Total U.S. Population

Foreign Residents Make Up Only 2 Percent Of The Total Population In Japan. "While foreign residents continue to make up only about 2 percent of the total population, they tend to congregate in a handful of urban areas and surrounding suburbs. As of 2015, 43 percent of Japan's foreign population lived in the greater Tokyo area; and approximately 10 percent apiece in Osaka Prefecture and Aichi Prefecture. Just one-fourth lived outside the top five urban areas." (David Green, "As Its Population Ages, Japan Quietly Turns To Immigration," Migration Policy Institute , 3/28/17)

  • In 2016, Immigrants Accounted For 13.5 Percent Of The Total U.S. Population. "More than 43.7 million immigrants resided in the United States in 2016, accounting for 13.5 percent of the total U.S. population of 323.1 million, according to American Community Survey (ACS) data. Between 2015 and 2016, the foreign-born population increased by about 449,000, or 1 percent, a rate slower than the 2.1 percent growth experienced between 2014 and 2015." ("Frequently Requested Statistics On Immigrants And Immigration In The United States," Migration Policy Institute , 2/8/18)

In Japan, There Are Only About 1,000 New Naturalizations Each Year. "However, there are only about 1,000 new naturalizations each year, compared to approximately 30,000 new permanent resident visas. In other words, the majority of long-term foreign residents in Japan acquire permanent residency rather than Japanese nationality." (David Green, "As Its Population Ages, Japan Quietly Turns To Immigration," Migration Policy Institute , 3/28/17)

  • In 2017, Japan Had An Estimated Population Of 126,451,398 People. (" CIA Factbook ," Accessed 6/21/18)

Japan Has Been "Passive" In Recognizing People As Refugees, Accepting 301 Refugees From 1981 To 2002. "Japan has been passive, however, in recognizing people as refugees according to the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees. As such, Japan accepted mere 301 refugees from 1982 to 2002. Rather, Japan is accepting a substantial number of people by way of granting special permission to stay on humanitarian grounds." (Yoshiaki Sato, " Immigration Law And Policy Of Japan In The Age Of East Asian Community-Building ," 2010)

In 2017, There Were 19,628 Asylum Seekers In Japan, But Only 20 Were Accepted. "The number of asylum seekers in Japan grew 80 percent to a record 19,628 in 2017 - but only 20 were accepted, the government said on Tuesday." ("Japan Took In 20 Asylum Seekers Last Year As Nearly 20,000 Applied," Reuters , 2/13/18)

AUSTRIA'S IMMIGRATION POLICIES

Austria Has Proposed Subjecting Asylum-Seekers To A Curfew And Mandatory X-Rays To Determine Asylum-Seekers' Age

Austria Grants Naturalization Only To Applicants Who Have Lived In The Country For At Least 10 Consecutive Years. "In general 10 years legal and continuous residence in Austria, therefrom minimum of 5 years with a residence permit." ("Citizenship," Migration.gv.at , Accessed 6/21/18)

Austria's Chancellor "Argued In Favor Of A System In Which Migrants Rescued In The Mediterranean Are Returned To Africa Rather Than Brought To Europe, And Pledged To Stop Illegal Immigration Altogether." "Kurz has said there is no point arguing over the current system of quotas because eastern states refuse to accept them. He has argued in favor of a system in which migrants rescued in the Mediterranean are returned to Africa rather than brought to Europe, and pledged to stop illegal immigration altogether." ("Austria Plans To Put Immigration, Borders At Heart Of EU Presidency," Reuters , 3/11/18)

In April 2016, "Austria [] Passed Controversial New Laws Restricting The Right Of Asylum That Would Allow Authorities To Turn Away Most Migrants At The Border If A State Of Emergency Is Invoked." "Austria has passed controversial new laws restricting the right of asylum that would allow authorities to turn away most migrants at the border if a state of emergency is invoked." (Tim Hume, Atika Shubert and Milena Veselinovic, "Austria Passes Tough New Asylum Laws As Attitudes To Migrants Harden," CNN , 4/26/16)

"The Laws, Among The Toughest European Responses To The Migrant Crisis, Come As The Country Prepares To Build Further Fences Along Its Borders." "The laws, among the toughest European responses to the migrant crisis, come as the country prepares to build further fences along its borders, and amid public anger over a shocking child rape case involving an Iraqi migrant." (Tim Hume, Atika Shubert and Milena Veselinovic, "Austria Passes Tough New Asylum Laws As Attitudes To Migrants Harden," CNN , 4/26/16)

In 2016, Austria Passed Legislation That Allows The Government To Declare A State Of Emergency Over Migration If It Deems The Country Lacks The Capacity To Receive, House And Integrate The Number Of People Who Want To Enter. "The legislation, passed Wednesday, allows Austria's government to declare a state of emergency over migration if it deems the country lacks the capacity to receive, house and integrate the number of people who want to enter, said Austrian Interior Ministry spokesman Karl-Heinz Grundboeck." (Tim Hume, Atika Shubert and Milena Veselinovic, "Austria Passes Tough New Asylum Laws As Attitudes To Migrants Harden," CNN , 4/26/16)

Austrian Interior Ministry Spokesman Said It "Would Give Authorities Sweeping Powers To Block Migrants From Entering If They Deem The Country From Which They Are Directly Entering - Not Their Homeland Is Safe." "[Austrian Interior Ministry spokesman Karl-Heinz Grundboeck] He said it would give authorities sweeping powers to block migrants from entering if they deem the country from which they are directly entering -- not their homeland -- is safe." (Tim Hume, Atika Shubert and Milena Veselinovic, "Austria Passes Tough New Asylum Laws As Attitudes To Migrants Harden," CNN , 4/26/16)

  • Austria's Minister "Suggested The Government Should Be Able To Check Migrants And Asylum Seekers' Mobile Data, In Order To Gather Information About Refugee Routes." "The new government - a coalition between the conservative People's Party (ÖVP) led by Chancellor Sebastian Kurz and the right-wing FPÖ - would prevent that trend from continuing by passing 'very, very tough asylum policies,' Kickl said. The minister suggested the government should be able to check migrants and asylum seekers' mobile data, in order to gather information about refugee routes." (Judith Mischke, "Austrian Interior Minister Promises 'Very, Very Tough Asylum Policies,'" Politico , 1/10/18)

Austria's Interior Minister "Proposed Mandatory X-Rays To Determine Asylum-Seekers' Age For Legal Purposes." "He also proposed mandatory X-rays to determine asylum-seekers' age for legal purposes." (Judith Mischke, "Austrian Interior Minister Promises 'Very, Very Tough Asylum Policies,'" Politico , 1/10/18)

Austria's Vice Chancellor "Suggested That Asylum Seekers Should Be Subject To A Curfew, And Be Housed In Military Barracks When They Are Seeking Asylum." "Last week Vice Chancellor Heinz-Christan Strache suggested that asylum seekers should be subject to a curfew, and be housed in military barracks when they are seeking asylum. Speaking to ORF he said it should be discussed other 'from a specific evening time onward, all refugees should have to be back in the barracks' as he is pushing for refugees to be housed in designated accommodation such as military barracks rather than private flats." (Chloe Kerr, "Austrian Minister Promises Crackdown On Immigration With 'Very, Very Tough Asylum Policies," Daily Express , 1/10/18)

CANADA'S IMMIGRATION POLICIES

Canada And The U.S. Have Reversed Immigration Systems, With Canada Favoring Immigrants With Economic Skills And The U.S. Favoring Those With Family Ties

Canada's Immigration Application System For Skilled Immigrants Has Been Compared To "Online Dating." "The best way to describe Canada's new application system for skilled immigrants is to compare it to online dating." (Alexia Fernández Campbell, "The Philosophical Differences On Immigration Between Canada And The U.S.," The Atlantic , 6/24/16)

  • Applicant Must "Fill Out Online Profiles With Their Age, Resume, Language Skills, Education, And Much More." Foreigners around the world who want to emigrate to Canada fill out online profiles with their age, resume, language skills, education, and much more." (Alexia Fernández Campbell, "The Philosophical Differences On Immigration Between Canada And The U.S.," The Atlantic , 6/24/16)

"Federal Workers Then Peruse Their Profiles, Which Are Ranked Based On The Applicant's Chance Of Economic Success And Integration," Awarding Points To The "Best Candidates." "Federal workers then peruse their profiles, which are ranked based on the applicant's chance of economic success and integration. Though it doesn't use a matchmaking algorithm, the system does award the most points to those it considers the best candidates. (Alexia Fernández Campbell, "The Philosophical Differences On Immigration Between Canada And The U.S.," The Atlantic , 6/24/16)

  • People Get Points Based On Job Offers, Fluency In Speak English And French, And Their Age, And "Whether Or Not They Have Work Experience In A High-Demand Field." People get points if they already have a job offer. They can also rack up points depending on how well they speak English and French, whether or not they are young, and whether or not they have work experience in a high-demand field." (Alexia Fernández Campbell, "The Philosophical Differences On Immigration Between Canada And The U.S.," The Atlantic , 6/24/16)

"Potential Immigrants With High Rankings Are Invited To Apply For Permanent Residency." "Potential immigrants with high rankings are invited to apply for permanent residency." (Alexia Fernández Campbell, "The Philosophical Differences On Immigration Between Canada And The U.S.," The Atlantic , 6/24/16)

THE UNITED KINGDOM'S IMMIGRATION POLICIES

The U.K. Uses A "Points-Based System", Awarding Points To Those With Higher Salaries And Jobs That Are On A List Of Shortage Occupations

Visas In The U.K. Work On A Points-Based System And Awards More Points To Those With Higher Salaries And For Jobs That Are On The List Of Shortage Occupations. "Visas work on a points-based system. The criteria for these visas has got tougher in recent years. For example, for a Tier2 'experienced skilled worker' visa, you now need to be paid at least £30,000 to apply, up almost £10,000 from 2011. You get more points for higher salaries or if your job is on the list of shortage occupations." (10 charts Explaining The UK's Immigration System," BBC, 5/2/18)

  • Most Visas Come With Other Conditions, Including Knowledge OF English, The Need Of A Sponsor And Agreeing Not To Claim Benefits For A Period Of Time. "Most visas come with other conditions, including a knowledge of English, the need for a sponsor and agreeing not to claim benefits for a period of time." (10 Charts Explaining The UK's Immigration System," BBC, 5/2/18)

GERMANY'S IMMIGRATION POLICIES

A Majority Of Germans Said They Opposed Reuniting Refugees With Their Families Or Taking In Any More Refugees After A Number Of Domestic Terror Attacks Were Carried Out

The Local: "Majority Of Germans Oppose Refugees Reuniting With Their Families." ("Majority Of Germans Oppose Refugees Reuniting With Their Families," The Local , 8/30/17)

According To A 2017 Survey, A Majority Of Germans Have For The First Time Said The Country Cannot Take In Any More Refugees. "A majority of Germans have for the first time said the country cannot take in any more refugees, according to a recent survey." (James Rothwell, "Majority Of Germans Feel They Cannot Take In Any More Refugees, Survey Finds," The Telegraph , 4/7/17)

  • 54 Percent Of Germans Believe Germany Has Reached The Point Where It Could No Longer Take In Refugees. "But the number of people who felt Germany had reached the point where it could no longer take in refugees had risen to 54 percent, up from just 40 per cent in 2015." (James Rothwell, "Majority Of Germans Feel They Cannot Take In Any More Refugees, Survey Finds," The Telegraph , 4/7/17)

"In March 2016, The German Government Decided To Delay Decision On Family Reunification For The People Offered Subsidiary Protection Until March 2018." "In March 2016 the German government decided to delay decision on family reunification for the people offered subsidiary protection until March 2018. In a recent discussion Merkel had at the federal press centre in Berlin, Merkel said she would only make firm decisions about family reunification for particular groups of refugees in 2018 if she is re-elected Chancellor, according to die Welt." ("Majority Of Germans Oppose Refugees Reuniting With Their Families," The Local , 8/30/17)


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